Student research

 

This search facility showcases work that was carried out by students in an undergraduate or postgraduate role (for example BSc, BA, MSc and PhD students).

There are several ways to carry out your search. The simplest is to enter your key word into the ‘Search Text’ box and click on the search button. For a more advanced search our search facility allows you to define the specifics of the project if you know what you are looking for such as author and institution and the topic of the research. You can also filter your results to order them to your preference whether that be peer reviewed, published or work that is still underway.

Most of the research showcased here is free to access, if your search returns a project that is behind a pay wall we will tell you this by showing a £ sign.

 
41 results found
Sort by Show
first | prev | 123...9 | next | last

Examining Commissioners leadership...

Peer reviewed and published

Liverpool John Moores University
Mr Peter Bohan
British Journal of Healthcare Management

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) now control around two-thirds of the NHS budget, influencing healthcare provider priorities and playing a key role in implementing the NHS plan. However, significant failures in healthcare have highlighted a dissonance between expressed values of leaders and everyday routine practices. This research explores the leadership behaviour of commissioners and the role it plays in determining quality and safety in healthcare. The research took a two phase pragmatic mixed method approach: phase 1 used focused video ethnography to observe commissioners in a mock boardroom setting; phase 2 employed a quantative questionnaire to determine the leadership behaviours that subordinates would expect their commissioners to adopt. The focused ethnography method used examined small communicative behaviours using a unique coding system which cross referenced audible communication with non-verbal visible communication to identify the most dominant and assertive Commissioners. The findings of this research identified that the leadership style most prevalent within the commissioners was transactional in nature. The questionnaire to subordinates of commissioners identified that transformational leadership had the best outcome on staff performance if this was linked to positive leadership style. This confusion of leadership behaviours, allied with poor analyse of risk leaves commissioners prone to repeating previous healthcare failures.

Examining Commissioners Leadership Behaviour

Peer reviewed and published

Liverpool John Moores University
Mr Peter Bohan, Graham Mitchell
British Journal of Healthcare Management

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) now control around two-thirds of the NHS budget, influencing healthcare provider priorities and playing a key role in implementing the NHS plan. However, significant failures in healthcare have highlighted a dissonance between expressed values of leaders and everyday routine practices. This research explores the leadership behaviour of commissioners and the role it plays in determining quality and safety in healthcare. The research took a two phase approach: phase 1 used focused video ethnography to observe commissioners in a mock board room setting; phase 2 employed a quantative questionnaire to determine the leadership behaviours that subordinates would expect their commissioners to adopt. The findings of this research identified that the leadership style most prevalent within the commissioners was transactional in nature. The questionnaire to subordinates of commissioners identified that transformational leadership had the best outcome on staff performance if this was linked to positive leadership style. In addition, commissioners appear to lack consistency when analysing risks effectively and holding providers to account, citing issues such as ‘professional drift’ and concerns over further scrutiny, as validation for this approach. This confusion of leadership behaviours, allied with poor analyse of risk leaves commissioners prone to repeating previous healthcare failures.

Psychosocial working conditions in a...

Peer reviewed and published

Mel Whitmore poster.pdf
University of Nottingham
Mel Whitmore

Background: The widely adopted Stress Management Standards approach to tackling stress at work utilises a generic questionnaire to identify potentially problematic areas. However, it does not explore whether there is any relationship between reported problems at work and health outcomes.
The Work Organisation Assessment Questionnaire, developed for use in the manufacturing sector, assesses employees’ perceptions of exposure to potential psychosocial hazards at work and estimates the risk of a number of health-related outcomes associated with exposure.

Aims: To examine the relationship between psychosocial working conditions and employee and organisational health within a manufacturing company. Results will inform the design of workplace health promotion interventions and will also represent the baseline data of a cycle of continuous improvement.

Method: 102 employees, from a workforce of 581, completed a survey based on the Work Organisation Assessment Questionnaire. Due to the low response rate (18%), respondent characteristics were compared with company-wide characteristics and no significant difference was identified. Odds ratios were calculated to estimate the risk of impairment to wellbeing, job satisfaction and subjective health associated with exposure to psychosocial hazards at work.

Results: Results indicated that exposure to psychosocial hazards was associated with all three outcome variables. In addition, low job satisfaction is associated with poor subjective health and poor subjective health is associated with poor wellbeing.

Conclusions: Findings are consistent with previous research in this area. This study demonstrates how applied research in this area may be utilised to build the case for the development of workplace initiatives designed to protect and promote health in the occupational health setting.

Challenging Variances in Employee Engagement...

Peer reviewed and published

Simon Hatson poster.pdf
University of Portsmouth
Simon Hatson

Challenging Variances in Employee Engagement Across a Vessel Hierarchy’
Aim: To evaluate the levels of engagement of Marine crew (who operate and maintain the vessels) and Survey Crew (who operate upon the vessel) with on-board health and safety systems.

Based upon fundamental statistical analysis, it was alleged a significant imbalance existed in the engagement with health & safety systems between the Marine and Survey crews on-board a fleet of survey vessels.

Quantative and qualitative analysis of health & safety performances was used to evaluate levels of engagement across the management systems. The quantative aspect consisted of the analysis of lagging indicators, such as accident reports, days served on-board and observation cards, as well as leading indicators, such as on-board training and employee / management interactions.

Qualitative research was undertaken by visiting vessels and completing a case study to better understand perceptions from both sides of the divide.

Language barriers were noted as a root cause for low levels of engagement amongst a multicultural crew. However the most notable finding was an observed level of apathy amongst the Marine Crew relating to their uneasiness, and often unwillingness to raise concerns with the Captain. Further research is required to understand the potential influence of cultural norms as a contributor to this apathy. However, initial results indicated that other contributory factors may also include:
 Contract type – The Marine Crew was predominantly employed on temporary contracts.
 Hierarchal structure – Marine Crews operated within a military-like structure, while the Survey Crew operate with a much flatter structure, leading to noticeable differences in the levels of interaction between management / non-management within the respective disciplines.
 Education – Survey Crews were predominantly educated to degree level, while Marine Crew training was invariably limited to maritime training.
Education of the vessel leaders was deemed essential if the apathy was to be addressed. Tools and techniques were required to enable the leaders to engage with those who do not expect to be asked for their opinion, especially if they were to get an honest answer.
Challenging Variances in Employee Engagement Across a Vessel Hierarchy’
Aim: To evaluate the levels of engagement of Marine crew (who operate and maintain the vessels) and Survey Crew (who operate upon the vessel) with on-board health and safety systems.

Based upon fundamental statistical analysis, it was alleged a significant imbalance existed in the engagement with health & safety systems between the Marine and Survey crews on-board a fleet of survey vessels.

Quantative and qualitative analysis of health & safety performances was used to evaluate levels of engagement across the management systems. The quantative aspect consisted of the analysis of lagging indicators, such as accident reports, days served on-board and observation cards, as well as leading indicators, such as on-board training and employee / management interactions.

Qualitative research was undertaken by visiting vessels and completing a case study to better understand perceptions from both sides of the divide.

Language barriers were noted as a root cause for low levels of engagement amongst a multicultural crew. However the most notable finding was an observed level of apathy amongst the Marine Crew relating to their uneasiness, and often unwillingness to raise concerns with the Captain. Further research is required to understand the potential influence of cultural norms as a contributor to this apathy. However, initial results indicated that other contributory factors may also include:
 Contract type – The Marine Crew was predominantly employed on temporary contracts.
 Hierarchal structure – Marine Crews operated within a military-like structure, while the Survey Crew operate with a much flatter structure, leading to noticeable differences in the levels of interaction between management / non-management within the respective disciplines.
 Education – Survey Crews were predominantly educated to degree level, while Marine Crew training was invariably limited to maritime training.
Education of the vessel leaders was deemed essential if the apathy was to be addressed. Tools and techniques were required to enable the leaders to engage with those who do not expect to be asked for their opinion, especially if they were to get an honest answer.

Weight and Activity Levels in Fire...

Peer reviewed and published

Beale Poster.pptx
University of Nottingham
Jane Beale

Introduction: This study involved a survey of retained and whole-time fire fighters. Differences in activity and weight were examined.

Background: Firefighting can be a physically demanding role. Overweight and inactivity are factors known to contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease; one US study found that 45% of on-duty deaths in fire fighters were due to cardiac events. Members of the public can join the fire service as retained fire fighters with minimal or no ongoing provision for fitness. However all fire fighters are expected to arrive for duty fit for their role. Knowledge on the activity and weight profile of fire fighters on different work contracts could inform policy and interventions to promote health and safety in fire fighters.

Aims: To compare weight and activity levels in operational whole time and retained fire fighters.

Methods: The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form was used to establish self-reported activity levels. Data were collected on mass and height. One hundred and fifty-five fire fighters completed surveys (38% response rate). After deletion of invalid cases analyses were conducted on a sample of 124 male fire fighters (51 whole time and 73 retained). Correlations, t-tests and odds ratios were calculated.

Results: The majority of whole time and retained fire fighters reported high activity levels. One in six fire fighters were obese (BMI ≥ 30). Retained fire fighters were almost two-and-a-half times more likely than whole time fire fighters to be overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 27).

Conclusion: Retained fire fighters showed higher risk of overweight and obesity than whole time fire fighters. However, no difference was demonstrated between activity levels. These findings suggest a focus on retained fire fighters is warranted when considering interventions to enhance the fitness of fire fighters.

first | prev | 123...9 | next | last

Institution of Occupational Safety and Health
The Grange, Highfield Drive, Wigston, Leicestershire, LE18 1NN, UK

t +44 (0)116 257 3100    f +44 (0)116 257 3101

Site developed and maintained by Xibis and IOSH